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Construction & Design

Reilly has crane operator license revoked after Tribeca collapse

The city has permanently revoked the license of a crane operator invovled in the Tribeca collapse that killed a 38-year-old man and wounded three other people.

Kevin J. Reilly’s license had been suspended since December 2016, 10 months after high winds caused his 565-foot crane to crash across two blocks of Worth Street.

Investigators later blamed Reilly for failing to properly secure the crane and not lowering it to a recommended height, causing it to become unstable in bad weather.

Last month, a City administrative law judge recommended that Reilly’s license be revoked. On Monday, Buildings Commissioner Rick D. Chandler, P.E. issued a Commissioner’s Order revoking Reilly’s Hoist Machine Operator’s license and served him with multiple violations a result of the collapse, with a total of $52,000 in fines imposed.

“Public safety requires that we hold crane operators to the highest standards. We conducted a painstaking investigation of the Tribeca collapse, both to hold accountable those responsible and to learn from this tragedy to improve crane safety. I thank the investigators from DOB, the NYC Department of Investigation, and the federal government for their work on this case, and I’m grateful to our partners in the City Council, with whom we worked on a package of legislation to strengthen the city’s crane regulations, which were already the toughest in the nation,” said Commissioner Chandler.

Following the Tribeca collapse, DOB implemented a number of new crane regulations, strengthening what were already the most stringent hoist machine regulations in the nation.

The new measures include banning the type of “crawler crane” that collapsed from the streets of New York and making it mandatory for safety directors to be on site and requiring anemometers on most cranes operating in the city

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